Somewhere in the Rockies, a Chest Worth Millions Awaits the One Who Can Decipher This Clue…

By 3 years ago

Think back to when you were a kid, reading stories about buried treasure, drawing your own treasure maps. Maybe you took it a step further and began digging in the yard, looking for the next big discovery. The thought of riches and rare artifacts dancing in your imagination.

A New Mexican man, has made treasure-hunters dreams come true, after he buried a collection of rare jewels, coins, and other treasures, worth over a million dollars, with only a poem to help those who seek it. Think you can solve the puzzle? It’s never too late to pursue a childhood dream, the treasure is waiting…

Hidden in the Rockies

Somewhere in the Rockies, in the roughly 1,000 miles between Santa Fe and the Canadian border, may be a treasure chest worth millions. The man who hid the fortune, back in 2010, is Forrest Fenn, now 87, former Vietnam fighter pilot, self-taught archaeologist, and successful art dealer. He has spent his life as a treasure hunter, a real-life Indiana Jones who has bought, sold, traded, and dug his way to a peerless collection of artifacts. Now he is determined to avoid becoming “the leftovers of history” himself, and has set in motion a plan he thinks will make headlines—perhaps a thousand years from now…

 

The Treasures Within

Fenn says, one day, he opened an antique lockbox and began to fill it with more than a million dollars’ worth of treasure. He tossed in ancient figurines, a 17th-century Spanish ring, and turquoise beads excavated from a cliff dwelling near Mesa Verde. He added American eagle gold coins, gold nuggets, a vial of gold dust, two gold discs, and “a lot of jewelry,” including rubies, sapphires, and diamonds. Among these wonders he included a copy of his own autobiography, rolled and stuffed into an ancient olive jar.

 

His Plan

Fenn originally filled the chest after he was diagnosed with cancer in 1988. He planned to drag it into the mountains to die beside it. After he survived, he left it in a walk-in vault at his house for years, where a couple of witnesses confirmed to NPR that they saw it filled to the brim with valuables…

 

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